ARCHITECTS
Blouin, Blouin & Associés

Gare Jean-Talon:
Colin M. Drewitt

 ARTISTS
Huguette Desjardins
Claire Sarrasin

 INAUGURATED
15 June 1987

View of the foot of the staircases from the mezzanine to the platforms

Platforms

The platform level of this eclectic station is of an innovative modern design. The most noticeable decorative feature is the brightly coloured triangle-ridged frieze across the whole length of the platform and up into the mezzanine. The various sides of the frieze ridges are done in different colours and patterns of swirling lines, in such a way that the a passenger passing on foot or by train sees a continually shifting field of colour and scheme. The frieze is by Huguette Desjardins.

View of a frieze section from the left
View of a frieze section from head on
View of a frieze section from the right
A section of the frieze seen from different angles

The large mezzanine sits under an arcade of wide-spanning arches set with fluorescent lights. It looks down over the platform through a concrete rampart pierced with large circles. The ridge patterns continue up into the mezzanine, visually linked by high walls from the platform to the upper level beside the staircases.

Ceiling arches over the mezzanine
Ceiling arches over the mezzanine

Métamorphose d'Icare, by Claire Sarrasin, in the light shaft

The light shaft seen from the mezzanine

At the foot of the stairs to the exit, a skylight washes the mezzanine with sunlight. Inside the light shaft, a brightly coloured acrylic sculpture is infinitely reflected on the mirrored walls. This beautiful work by Claire Sarrasin is entitled Métamorphose d'Icare ("The Metamorphosis of Icarus"), in homage to the Greek community of the area.

Interior of the exit, in the Gare Jean-Talon
Exterior of the exit, in the Gare Jean-Talon

Detail of the interior of the exit hall After all this modernism, the passenger is surprised to emerge from the escalators to find what looks like a splendid old 1920s train station, complete with molded ceilings, copper chandeliers, marble walls, and graceful details such as this disused drinking fountain.

In fact, the kiosk is built in the old Gare Jean-Talon, which formerly served the rail line on which the Blainville commuter train now runs. It has been restored in the monumental railway style of days gone past.

The commuter rail line itself is served by a small station platform a short walk away from the metro station entrance.

 MATT'S RATING
Four metros-worth the trip!Four metros-worth the trip!Four metros-worth the trip!Four metros-worth the trip!